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Author Topic: Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary  (Read 179 times)

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Offline 2b2gbi

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Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary
« on: August 01, 2019, 12:40:52 AM »


Hello SC4D! It's been a while! Very few of you probably remember me, I've been inactive here for quite some time, but I felt it was about time to return. I previously had an MD here call Insulo and Kaskaskia, but unfortunately most of the images were lost when the image host I used to use died.

Earlier this year I started a new project that I call Bienville, Missouri, this time made in Cities:Skylines. I have been posting this at ST, but I recently noticed that the header for the showcase sections says all games are welcome, so I decided to start posting here as well! (If am incorrect and this is in the wrong place, please let me know.) There have been three updates now over there, along with an extra video. I think, in order to avoid just dumping out everything at once, I'm going to release things gradually here to catch up to the journal on ST side. I think the schedule below will allow us to be on schedule for the next monthly update.

August 1 - Update One: The River Market and Bertling Park - Part One
August 16 - Update Two: The River Market and Bertling Park - Part Two
August 20 - Extra: Bienville Cinematic Video
August 24 - Update Three: Bertling Park

(Again, if there's a problem with this schedule, let me know.)

EDIT: Updated schedule due to SC4D dowtime.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 05:04:06 PM by 2b2gbi »
You can call me Jon. :)

Check out my MD: Bienville, Missouri

Offline 2b2gbi

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Re: Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2019, 12:49:16 AM »


Update One: River Market and Bertling Park - Part One

Hello SC4D!

Welcome to my new City Journal: Bienville, Missouri. Some of you may know me, most of you probably don't so I'll briefly introduce myself. My name is Jon, and I have previously authored one Mayor Diary, Insulo and Kaskaskia and the short-lived ST CJ Progress. I would link them, but due to my usage of the now-defunct Majhost and a strange issue with another host I used none of the pictures work . This is the first MD I have made in very long time (five years, to be exact) and my first ever in Cities: Skylines, but I have very high hopes for this project, so I hope you enjoy what I have to share with you.

Before we dive into the pictures, let me first introduce you to the idea behind Bienville and some basic information about the city. My goal with this project is to recreate a realistic, detailed America city. I always intended this project to be based in the central part of the United States, and eventually decided on a location in Southeastern, Missouri along the Mississippi River South of the convergence of the Mississippi and the Ohio. I chose this region because I wanted to draw inspiration from several cities in this part of the country, chiefly my hometown of Kansas City, St. Louis, and Memphis. The specific location was chosen for its location on the Mississippi River and the sparse population of the area in reality.  The city is definitely around the size of Kansas City and St. Louis, but I haven't completely nailed down its population at this point. The city has historically been very dependent on the river and railroads for transportation, and is a major industrial center. The name of the city indicates its origins, it was founded in the late 18th century by French fur-traders operating in French Louisiana, and named for the explorer and French Colonial Governor Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville.




That should be enough information to get started.

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This first update will be the first of two or three updates focusing on two of the city's oldest districts, the River Market and Bertling Park.

The first location we are going to visit is a great indication of the city's relationship with the river and its impacts on industry and transportation in the region. While Mississippi River shipping is not in its heyday, cargo-laden barges are still a common sight along the river.



Bootheel Chemicals Incorporated, founded in 1951 by a group of local businessmen, provides and transports a variety of chemical products throughout Southeastern Missouri, Western Kentucky, and Southern Illinois. This facility, located close to downtown Bienville, is a secondary shipping and storage facility with a dock on the river to allow for the transportation of chemicals in ships and barges along the Mississippi.



The facility is also serviced by a rail connection, allowing it access to three modes of transportation. It sits along Lemoyne Drive, a small industrial road that runs along the river outside of the cities formidable levee system. This location means that the facility requires protocols for the flooding that frequently occurs along the Mississippi. In this image we can also see a ship towing several barges upriver to other industrial facilities.

The next location featured today is a construction site in the River Market district.



Only a block away from the City market and directly adjacent to a streetcar station, this is prime real estate in one of the most popular neighborhoods in the city. Before it was purchased by a developer, the lot was home to a paid parking lot. The plans for the project have been a topic of fierce debate at City Hall, where neighborhood leaders lobbied against the original proposal for the site, a fourteen-story luxury apartment building, and forced the developers to alter their plans to something that better suited the character of the area.



The primary highway access to the River Market and Bertling Park districts in provided by Interstate 224, with exits at Mississippi Avenue, the first street inside the municipal levees, and Fifth Street. The interstate bisects Bertling Park, and is surrounded on each side by vacant, overgrown lots where proximity to the interstate has inhibited redevelopment since the raised portion of the highway through Bertling Park and bridge across the river were constructed in 1958. Mississippi Avenue, shown here, is serviced by an aging partial cloverleaf interchange that has become a popular shelter for the area's homeless population. In this image we are looking north toward the River Market over the westbound exits and several businesses positioned to attract motorists exiting the freeway. One of these businesses serves a local and regional favorite, barbecue.

The scene is also situated at an access point to the districts from the Kentucky side of the river.



The Bienville Strictoaster Cafe location is located at Grand Boulevard and First Street, at the end of the Pulitzer Bridge that carries US Route 86 across the Mississippi River. The heavy traffic that traverses this intersection prompted the city to construct a jughandle exit for the eastbound lanes. They accomplished this by converting a short stretch of Rue Sauvolle, named in honor of the first colonial governor of Louisiana, into  a one-way road, and the cafe sits in the center of that junction. Although the location makes the diner somewhat difficult to access, the exposure provided by the location's visibility on one of the city's busiest thoroughfares more than offsets this disadvantage.



Located along Mississippi Avenue near the border between the River Market and Bertling Park Districts, Levee Park is a relatively new city park created as part of an initiative to revitalize Bertling Park in the early 2000's. It provides walking and biking trails along with public spaces and a playground. It was well received by residents and has become a popular part of this transforming community. Across the street, another result of the district's revitalization can be seen. The Mississippi Village Development is a large complex of mid-range apartments constructed to take advantage of the neighborhood's emergence as a trendy arts district and the resulting increase in property value. The project, however, necessitated the demolition of two entire city blocks of mixed-use properties that were aging, but not in disrepair. The demolition and construction required for the complex was delayed for years by disputes between the developers, the city, and community leaders who vehemently opposed the project. Eventually, however, the project went ahead and was completed in 2016.




The Bienville Public Library's main branch is located adjacent to Iberville Square, which has served as a public gathering place for much of the city's history. It resides in a large, richly-decorated 1887 structure that formerly served as the home of the Bienville Commodities Exchange. Inside, the library features an extensive collection of fiction and non-fiction works, along with an extensive genealogical collection, archives of local history, and the Bienville History Museum. It frequently hosts public events both in the library and on its grounds adjacent to the square.

The next two images focus on two recent, but very different, development projects located around what has historically been known as "The Junction," a three-way intersection where Grand Boulevard and Clemens Street converge at their crossing with Fourth Street.



The first of these is the Market Square development, which features one mixed-use nine story tower, a 4 story residential building, and a connected three-level parking garage. This development marked the highest building built in the River Market district in many decades and was designed to have ample access to transit, including a street car station and bus stop directly adjacent to the property. This, coupled with its position within walking distance of the business district, Iberville Square, and the City Market make it a near perfect property for residents wanting independence from owning an automobile. It contrasts this distinction with its on-site parking garage, which is actually a public lot designed to provide greater access to Market Square and surrounding attractions. Among these is another development project that has received near-universal praise, a rare feat in the city, the Clemens Street Pedestrian Walk. This project, which has adopted the name "The Junction" from the meeting of the three streets, converted the short stretch of Clemens Street before it converges with Grand Boulevard and Fourth Street into a pedestrian street. A long plaza, complete with shade trees, replaced the roadway and buildings along the stretch were refurbished or renovated. The East end of the walk is capped by a small public park while the west end features a massive art installation looping above the walkway.



This project not only improved the conditions of this historic area, but it eliminated the three-way intersection that previously had been one of the most congested and dangerous junctions in the city. The old buildings now house trendy shops and restaurants and numerous loft apartments catering to people who want move back into the city from suburbs. These two development projects have been held up examples of revitalization projects done right in a city that has seen many controversial developments.

Finally, we have arrived at the beating heart of these districts and downtown as a whole.



The City Market, which is the reason this district is referred to as the river market, features a covered outdoor marketplace and a large indoor market hall. The market building, build in 1879 as a train station, is home to numerous permanent and temporary vendors and eateries, while the outdoor area hosts twice-weekly farmers markets flush with local produce. It is one of the busiest markets in the united States, and has operated continuously in this location since 1906. Its recent resurgence in popularity has been key to the emergence of the River Market as one of the most desirable neighborhoods in the city.

This brings the first update of Bienville to and end. I hope you all enjoyed this as much as I enjoyed creating it. Please share any ideas you have, any comments, or any criticisms. I also appreciate feedback.

Until next time, thanks for reading!
You can call me Jon. :)

Check out my MD: Bienville, Missouri

Offline art128

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Re: Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2019, 02:43:22 AM »
That's a very nice looking city you've been building.

Looking forward for more. :)
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Offline evarburg

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Re: Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2019, 09:21:45 AM »
WOW, CS-S has much evolved since I played its first version, at least as far as cities are concerned (...and the water. OMG, the water, still ! I can live without it “really” flowing in SC4, but the texture ! I wish there was someone who could do a new water for SC4 using that texture ! Even RFR's does not come close enough, I feel.) I hope there will be countryside pictures in your CJ -- it was my great beef with CSS, that and the transport spaghetti obsession :-). The foliage, at least, now seems up to par (or is it a trick of the photoshop kind ? ;)) Anyhow, great beginning !  :thumbsup:

Offline 2b2gbi

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Re: Bienville, Missouri - A Cities:Skylines Mayor Diary
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2019, 05:16:53 PM »
Replies:

That's a very nice looking city you've been building.

Looking forward for more. :)

Thank you very much.  :)

WOW, CS-S has much evolved since I played its first version, at least as far as cities are concerned (...and the water. OMG, the water, still ! I can live without it “really” flowing in SC4, but the texture ! I wish there was someone who could do a new water for SC4 using that texture ! Even RFR's does not come close enough, I feel.) I hope there will be countryside pictures in your CJ -- it was my great beef with CSS, that and the transport spaghetti obsession :-). The foliage, at least, now seems up to par (or is it a trick of the photoshop kind ? ;)) Anyhow, great beginning !  :thumbsup:

Thanks!  :)

There are some pretty nice water's for SC4 around, but I agree that is one area C:S just looks better. I do plan to do some countryside, but I'm not sure when. I kinda want to get the city center to a decent spot before I move too far out. I still haven't touched the CBD, so that is next on the agenda I think after I wrap up these older riverfront areas. You never know, though, I might get tired of the urban setting and take a break by building something more rural toward the edge of the map.

As far as the foliage, the only image editing I do to these is adding the borders and captions at the bottom. There is some very nice foliage available for the game now. Most of the foliage I use is from the C:S foliage masters Mr. Maison and pdelmo, along with grasses from the detail mod by Ronyx (these are especially useful because they can be colored to match your map's grass texture, but for anyone looking to use them read the description, they have some known bugs and are INCREDIBLY resource intensive.)



Update Two: The River Market and Bertling Park - Part Two

Hello SC4D!

Welcome back for the second update of Bienville. In this update we'll continue our tour of the River Market and Bertling Park districts of Bienville. If this is your first time reading, I recommend you go back to the first entry and read the introduction to the city and the districts we're exploring.

Our first location today is an area inside the River Market District known as Gardner Mill. The neighborhood is named for a large textile mill that once occupied the area East of Second Street between New Madrid Street and Illinois Avenue.



The mill closed during the depression, and sat abandoned for years before being demolished in 1951. The neighborhood around it faced similar struggles, but ultimately most of the area avoided the fate of its namesake, and in the late 1970's became the center of Bienville's LGBT scene when several businesses catering to the community opened in the area.



The largest and most successful of these businesses is the Colours Nightclub, which has occupied a former hotel on St. Louis Street since 1978. A large mural decorates the eastern wall of the building, and has become an icon in Bienville. The buildings to the East of the club were destroyed by a fire in the 1940's and have since been replaced by an Exxon gas station and another Beinville instiution, Harlan's Famous Ice Cream.



The row of buildings across St. Louis Avenue from Colours is home to several local business, including a bar, health foods store, and a microbrewery. In recent years the craft beer scene in Bienville has exploded, and numerous breweries have opened throughout the city. This brewery features a brewpub and a large outdoor seating area, which has quickly become a popular gathering place in the neighborhood.

The entire neighborhood is served by the Gardner Mill/Chouteau Park streetcar station, which allows easy access to the area's bars and clubs from around the city. In 2006 the city installed a unique, rainbow pattern crosswalk across St. Louis Avenue between several of the most popular venues in the neighborhood and added signals to increase safety at the crossing.



Another prominent feature of the neighborhood is Chouteau Park, a small park West of Second Street between St. Louis Avenue and Illinois Avenue. The gazebo in the park is a popular location for gatherings, ranging from birthdays to weddings. Just North of the park is the recently finished River Market Community Center, which provides residents with a variety of services and gym facilities. Father South down Second Street is the future site of the Gardner Commons, a mixed-use development slated to occupy the location of an office building damaged by fire last year. Currently the project is in the final stages of demolition, and is currently projected to be completed in sometime in late 2019.

One landmark in the River Market district is the Bienville Central Post Office, located at the junction of Grand Boulevard and Forth Street.



Constructed in 1911, the Beaux-Arts brick and limestone structure has been the primary post office for the city since it was built. In recent years, however, there has been discussion of moving the post office to a more modern and spacious facility elsewhere in the city.

Further to the East, Grand Avenue becomes US Route 86 and crosses the Mississippi via the Albert Neves Memorial Bridge, named for a former mayor and state senator.



The approach for the bridge begins at first street and carries the highway over Mississippi Avenue. Nestled against the bridge approach is Los Geckos, a popular local Mexican restaurant and bar. The large industrial building next to the restaurant is occupied by the offices of several companies, the largest of which is the Urban Deco architectural firm. This company has grown rapidly in recent years, and its projects can be seen throughout the city.

Following Mississippi Avenue to the South brings us to the Stuart Hall lofts, one of the largest converted industrial buildings in the River Market.



Formerly home to a cereal factory and then Stuart Hall Stationary Company, the building now houses a number of studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom apartments featuring exposed brick and rafters. It features an exercise room and an outdoor plaza with a pool. The building across Cairo Street from the lofts is still an active industrial building, and houses the warehouse of the Kruse Importing Company, which has occupied the space since 1909.

Now we will move even further South to explore the half of the Berling Park District that lies to the North of Interstate 224.



Most of the commercial activity lies along Mississippi Avenue between Kentucky Street and Bertling Street. Several local business occupy these buildings and attract clientele from the neighborhood and the traffic heading into the city from the Interstate. Behind this strip there are mostly residential buildings with some small restaurants and shops mixed in. The Holy Rosary Catholic Church, one of the largest landmarks in Bertling Park, lies just out of frame to the West.



Built in 1801 and reconstructed in 1866 after it was partially destroyed by fire, the church is one of the oldest standing buildings in the city. Its 170 ft spire towers over the surrounding buildings and its small cemetery is the final resting place of several prominent figures in the history of the city. For many years the church was the tallest building in Bienville.



We end this update with a view along Bertling Street at Third, near where Interstate 224 divides Berting Park in two. A businesses, like this Waffle House, have moved into this area, but in general this swath of Bertling Park has never recovered from the demolition of several blocks of housing to construct the interstate and the decreased property values from the proximity to the noisy thoroughfare. Much of the area was declared blighted by the city government in the 1980's and demolished, leaving behind large empty lots, some of which still sit vacant while others have been converted to parking lots, auto shops, or self-storage facilities.

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Thank you everyone for reading, and thank you for all the positive feedback on the first update. I mentioned in the first update that I was considering creating some video content for Bienville, which I have since put some work into and am excited to be able to show you sometime in the next week.

Until next time.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2019, 03:08:51 AM by 2b2gbi »
You can call me Jon. :)

Check out my MD: Bienville, Missouri